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Dates Confirmed For Europe’s New Travel Rules—Here’s What To Know - Forbes

Author: Forbes

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/alexledsom/2023/10/30/dates-confirmed-for-europes-new-travel-rules-heres-what-to-know/

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Europe's border system is changing—here's what to know about the new Entry and Exit Scheme and ETIASgettyThe rules for most people entering Europe who don't have an EU passport are changing and after several delays, the EU has confirmed when and how they will roll out the two new border controls that will impact travelers arriving into the Schengen area from 2024 onwards.The changes effectively involve the installation of automatic gates that will record the biometric data of anyone passing through an external EU border (the Entry and Exit Scheme) and the registration of anyone without an EU passport, who doesn't need a visa, before they arrive (ETIAS).Both are explained in detail below.The new EU Entry and Exit System—operational in 2024Europe's new Entry/Exit System (EES) is the first major change and it has been confirmed that it will become operational during the second half of 2024, as confirmed by the EU Home Affairs Council in Luxembourg.Up to now, most countries stamp passports as people carrying non-EU passports enter but the process will now be automated by passing through barriers that identify you through biometric data—your fingerprints and faces will be scanned as you pass through electronic gates.The aim is to decrease the time it takes to pass through external EU borders and to keep a firmer control on how long people stay inside the EU/Schengen area.The new EES will be used by 29 European countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Lichtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland.In Cyprus and Ireland, passports will still be stamped manually.What's more, anyone traveling to and from Bulgaria and Romania should be aware that the rules are a little different as neither country issues a Schengen visa.The EU has also confirmed the data that it will collect each time a traveler passes through one of its external border gates: the data listed in your travel document, such as your name and date of birth.the date and place of entry into and exit from a European country using the EES.your facial image and fingerprints (called ‘biometric data’). any previous refusal of entry.The new EES is applicable to anyone traveling on a short-stay visa and those who don't need a visa to travel.It is also relevant for anyone on a non-EU passport who is intending to stay for the 90-day period allowed within a 180-day period—and crucially, this 90 days is relevant even if you travel to and from different EU countries during this time.The ETIAS—operational in spring 2025The European Travel Information and Authorisation System (ETIAS) is a new scheme that requires all visitors traveling to Europe—who do not require a visa—to register beforehand, much like the U.S.ESTA scheme.It is not a visa but just a pre-authorization to travel and is now expected to be operational by spring 2025.It will have an impact on people visiting Europe from over 60 countries—where visas are not required.If you are unsure if you will need to register, you can check this list of the 60 plus countries here. They include the U.S., Canada and the U.K.The ETIAS scheme will be used by 30 European countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Lichtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland.Travelers under 18 and over 70 will be exempt from payment, which for everyone else is expected to be $7.The right to enter will last 3 years, after which time, travelers must reapply.Both schemes were supposed to be introduced earlier but technical issues slowed down the roll out and France asked the EU, after these delays, to put back the roll out until after the Olympic Games in summer 2024, as evidently it isn't a great idea to change the way that travelers enter Europe just before one million extra people are expected to arrive in Paris.The new deadline fulfils the conclusions of a recent study into the possible decoupling of both schemes conducted by a Belgian delegation.

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